Friday, July 31, 2020

SOS & Poetry Friday & #52Stories 30/52: Playing with Words for My First Nonet

  Catherine at Reading  to the Core is hosting  
this week's roundup of poetic goodness. 
Check out her poem "The Edge of the World" 
for a bit of mermaid love, inspired by an 
illustration by Emily Winfield Martin

Sometimes I have no idea of what I'm going to write for a particular post and today was one of those Fridays. When this happens, I usually just start reading and before long, someone inspires me and I'm ready to write.  Today's inspiration came from Irene's post and the handout she created, How to Write a Nonet. A nonet is a nine-line poem that starts with one syllable in the first line and ends with nine syllables in the last line (or the reverse).

Suddenly I knew I wanted to combine my Poetry Friday post with Sharing Our Stories - Open Invitation #17: Have fun! And I remembered the box of words I've clipped and saved, inspired by Leigh Anne Eck's found poems she wrote for National Poetry Month in April. 

So I opened that box of words and reminded myself that summer is flying by and I need to relish the days (yes, even during the pandemic). Here's my playful attempt (thanks, Ruth) at writing my first nonet (thanks, Irene) using my box of saved words (thanks, Leigh Anne). It was fun!
Dream
Enjoy
Celebrate
Play every day
Delicious summer
Everyone's invited
Walk, dance, party, linger in
ice cream days of songs and stories
Go! Create, cut-up, glow, be happy.
- Ramona Behnke

To savor the magic of story, join the fun each week by linking your story at Sharing Our Stories. 

10 comments:

  1. Oh, I love this! The combination of the cut out words AND nonet is fun and creative. I really think my students would like this. Going to go back to Irene's blog and grab that hand-out now!

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  2. Way to combine ideas and go for it, Ramona! That really does look like a fun student project, too. Having students collect words they like would be a great way to build a positive relationship with vocabulary and writing.

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  3. "Ice cream days of songs and stories"...I love that line! This such a fun idea for a poem, and the idea of collecting words is enticing. So glad I got to read it!

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  4. Another way to express ideas in a new(to me) form of poetry. Something for me to try out for sure! 🙂 I liked the idea of “Delicious summer”. Pondering those words helped me to shift my thinking a bit. Time for a treasure hunt into my life to find what is delicious about my summer.

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  5. "ice cream days" What delicious phrasing! Lovely, Ramona!

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  6. I am so glad that I "contributed" to your poetry and fun today! "ice cream days of songs and stories" is my favorite line as it is the perfect metaphor for summer days - which are dwindling fast for me. School starts this week. This makes me want to play in my words today, too!

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  7. Thank you for sharing this fun-filled post, Ramona! I love how you drew inspiration from so many different sources to create your nonet. Sometimes it's a challenge to remember to "be happy," but everyday includes something to celebrate, doesn't it?

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  8. I could linger in your ice cream days, Ramona. You’re right. Summer is whizzing by. The grand girls are coming at the end to celebrate my son’s birthday. One last look at the house.

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  9. Such fun! We have the best friends with such great ideas! Who knew all those years ago when I just happened upon the idea of blogging that I would meet and find inspiration from friends like Ruth, Irene, and Leigh Anne- and you. This poem is a celebration of all that as well as the celebration of summer happiness.(I recognize most of the commenters, too!)

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  10. So fun, Ramona! I love the line:
    Everyone's invited.

    Sam and Jordan return to school next week and I find myself thinking one thing: MORE. I just want more summer with them. I know this is Very Selfish, but it is true.

    I'm so happy you write and write and write.

    xo,
    Ruth

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